History Of The Wet Suit

WOW, soo exciting to learn more and more about one of my favorite bucket lists.. Surfing…And of course Scuba!
And to hear that guy who fabricated the O’neil wet suit, lives right here in Nor Calif:) Cool right?wet suit idea
Sometime around 1952, Jack opened the first Surf Shop in a garage across the Great Highway. He shaped a few balsa surfboards and sold accessories like paraffin wax and a few vests he started gluing together from neoprene. When the vests started selling, Jack decided to go into the wetsuit business. His friends laughed. They asked him what he planned to do for business after the handful of surfers in the area had bought one. Jack said he’d cross that bridge when he got to it.
The use of wetsuits in a range of water sports. For protective clothing specialized for scuba diving, see Diving suit. For the G.I. Joe character, see Wet Suit (G.I. Joe).
Surf Up! What’s your favorite wet suit? Cindy- Bucket List Coach

1960s beavertail wetsuit

Beuchat beavertail wetsuit with twistlock fasteners

Detail showing zipper attachment and cover flap

A wetsuit is a garment, usually made of foamed neoprene, which is worn by surfers, divers, windsurfers, canoeists, and others engaged in water sports, providing thermal insulation, abrasion resistance and buoyancy. The insulation properties depend on bubbles of gas enclosed within the material, which reduce its ability to conduct heat. The bubbles also give the wetsuit a low density, providing buoyancy in water.

Hugh Bradner, a University of California, Berkeley physicist invented the modern wetsuit in 1952. Wetsuits became available in the mid-1950s and evolved as the relatively fragile foamed neoprene was first backed, and later sandwiched, with thin sheets of tougher material such as nylon or later Lycra/Spandex. Improvements in the way joints in the wetsuit were made by gluing, taping and blindstitching, helped the suit to remain waterproof and reduce flushing, the replacement of water trapped between suit and body by cold water from the outside.[1] Further improvements in the seals at the neck, wrists and ankles produced a suit known as a “semi-dry”.

Different types of wetsuit are made for different uses and for different temperatures.[2] Suits range from a thin (2 mm or less) “shortie”, covering just the torso, to a full 8 mm semi-dry, usually complemented by neoprene boots, gloves and hood.

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